Rebuilding A Foam Cored Rudder Part 2

The foam that I used in this video was a #16 closed cell urethane foam supplied by US-Composites. Here’s a link to their foam page for spec’s and pricing. In total I believe I used roughly 4 gallons (2 gal of part A, and 2 gal of part B) for this rudder which was for a Freedom 35.

When doing this type of repair, it really helps to have the rudder mounted on a couple of saw horses. This allows good access to all sides of the rudder, and makes it easy to tilt the rudder on edge for pouring the foam (ensuring that all the nooks and pockets get completely filled).

The next video should be out in a couple weeks!

If you have any questions or comments please leave them below :-)
If you’re a Spammer, piss off!!

Thanks for watching.

~Andy

Comments
9 Responses to “Rebuilding A Foam Cored Rudder Part 2”
  1. Frank says:

    Hi Andy,

    I looked at the first video on this and I’m still wondering about that rudder post.

    Would it have been better to weld some bars on the post to keep it solid in the rudder before pouring? I know that if you had and it failed, you would be blamed for “enhancing” the post design but if it fails as is, won’t someone say,”You saw the problem, why didn’t you correct it?”

    Do you see these manufacturing ‘cost-cutting’ solutions often in well priced vessels?

    Thanks,

    Frank

    • ~Andy ~Andy says:

      I decided not to alter the original construction of the rudder for a couple reasons. Primarily because I have great confidence in this manufacturer’s R&D. Their boats are what’s considered “free standing” rigs meaning that there are no stays or shrouds to help keep the mast straight and upright. They incorporate a lot of carbon fiber into their designs and know probably as much as anyone what their materials can tolerate. If they say it’s good, I believe them (although it’s not how it’s typically done, but on the other hand most boats aren’t designed to be free standing rigs!)..

      The other reason I didn’t alter anything was for liability. If I change something on the design I then become liable if something were to happen :-)

      Not sure why the original issue of a hollow post was left the way it was. I’m guessing it was an oversight on this particular rudder and not the ‘norm’. At least I hope so!! The post was a combination of glass and carbon fiber with roughly 5/8″ side walls (extremely strong!). Honestly not too concerned about it. They’ve been building boats for years and I am not aware of the shafts being a strength issue.

      Have a safe and happy New Year!

  2. michael givens says:

    Do you have any problem with the foam not adhering to the previous pour? Can you pour a larger amount of foam at a time with a lighter density? Can’t wait for the next installment.

    • ~Andy ~Andy says:

      Hi Mike,

      never had a problem with bonding. It is some very sticky stuff! Lighter density foams will expand more than dense, so you probably could do larger pours without too much heat buildup. BUT, I would suggest doing some testing to see how it goes. I’m a fan of multiple thinner pours rather than less thicker ones (just for safety) :-)

      Hope this helps!

      Have a safe and happy New Year!

      ~Andy

  3. CB Ainsworth says:

    What was the rudder post made of? Looked like a fiberglass post inside the rudder. No “metal ears” as you called them were attached to post to help with the turning of rudder. What’s up with that?

    • ~Andy ~Andy says:

      The post appeared to me a combination of glass and carbon fiber. The walls were roughly 5/8″ thick (which is extremely strong!).

      I decided not to alter the original construction of the rudder for a couple reasons. Primarily because I have great confidence in this manufacturer’s R&D. Their boats are what’s considered “free standing” rigs meaning that there are no stays or shrouds to help keep the mast straight and upright. They incorporate a lot of carbon fiber into their designs and know probably as much as anyone what their materials can tolerate. If they say it’s good, I believe them.. The other reason I didn’t alter anything was for liability. If I change something on the design I then become liable if something were to happen :-)

      Not sure why the original issue of a hollow post was left the way it was. I’m guessing it was an oversight on this particular rudder and not the ‘norm’. At least I hope so!!

      Have a safe and happy New Year!

  4. Peter I says:

    Very interesting videos, all of them! I commend you for your willingness to educate others.

    I wonder how this design resists what must be tremendous torque on the rudder (e.g., following seas, backing down). Maybe the carbon fiber post just sticks so well to the foam that it is strong enough. I agree Freedom has a good rep, and the one I sailed was robust (odd not to have shrouds to grab as you walk forward, though) – on the other hand, look at the water logging of this one.

    Did you do anything to prevent future water incursion down the tube? Maybe the denser foam would be the “plug”?

    • ~Andy ~Andy says:

      With the work that was done (specifically upgrading the density of the foam) the structure should be stronger than original. I put a lot of confidence in Freedom’s R&D; based on the original material used, the post alone is strong enough to withstand any pressures under way (It was bonded to the other side of the rudder skin full length of the post) :-)

  5. Tim P says:

    Hi Andy. I first saw one of your videos on you tube . I’ve since told every boating friend about your show. Very informative and entertaining, I look forward to your future videos. I have a 31 Oday and do all my own repairs and upgrades. Thanks for all the tips and advice.

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